Film series: THE WHOLE WORLD WAS WATCHING

 
  • Des Moines
  • Art Center
  • 4700 Grand Ave
  • Des Moines, Iowa
  • 515.277.4405
  • Hours | Directions

  • John & Mary Pappajohn
  • Sculpture Park
  • 13th and Grand Ave
  • Downtown
  • Des Moines, Iowa
  • Hours | Directions

 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1 / 6:30 PM
Lecture with Civil Righs Scholar Gerald O'Grady: 6:30 pm; film immediately follows.

The March 1963
James Blue, director / 37 minutes
Said to be the most important film made on the March on Washington, August 28, 1963, the film
follows the arrival of the participants for the largest public assembly in American history, and
culminates with Martin Luther King, Jr.’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech. Blue directed, wrote,
and read the commentary of this unusual combination of multi-crewed cinema verité and
traditional documentary.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4 / 1:30 PM
These films will be introduced by Gerald O’Grady.

Nine from Little Rock 1964
Charles Guggenheim, director / 20 minutes
This Academy Award-winning film about school desegregation in Arkansas features the first
use of the militia in the civil rights years, as President Dwight Eisenhower nationalizes the
National Guard and sends the 101st Airborne Division to enforce the federal court order of
students' admission challenged by Governor Orval Faubus.

Integration Report I 1960
Madeline Anderson, director / 24 minutes
Filmed by Albert Maysles and Richard Leacock, this documentary on civil rights marches,
sit-ins, rallies, and boycotts is set in an American landscape of rigid segregation. Anderson
was the first African-American feminist filmmaker of the movement.

The Streets of Greenwood [Mississippi] 1963
Jack Willis, director / 20 minutes
Filmed by Ed Emshwiller, The Streets records a SNCC (Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee)
voter registration drive, featuring an appearance by the young Bob Dylan.

The Children Were Watching 1961
Richard Leacock, director / 25 minutes
This film records the integration of primary schools in New Orleans, Louisiana and the violent
demonstrations of white parents.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15 / 6:30 PM

Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment / 1963
Robert Drew, director / 52 minutes
Filmed by famed documentarians D. A. Pennebaker, Richard Leacock, and others, this film records
the conflict of President John F. Kennedy and his brother Robert, the U.S. Attorney General, with
Governor George Wallace, over the integration of the University of Alabama.

Mississippi: Is This America? 1962–1964, Part Five, Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil
Rights Years
1986
Henry Hampton, director / 58 minutes
One of the 14-hour television series made by Blackside in Boston, this film depicts the murders
of Emmett Till, and later, Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Micky Schwerner, and the activities
of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18 / 1:30 PM

A Time for Burning 1967
William Jersey and Barbara Connell, directors / 58 minutes
This film chronicles the attempted integration of the Augustana Lutheran Church in Omaha,
Nebraska. It has been placed in the Library of Congress National Film Registry.

Listen Whitey! 1968
Leslie Woodhead, director / 25 minutes
Shot for Granada TV in the United Kingdom, this film records events in the traumatic weekend
following Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination.

The Best of Black Journal
1968 –1970
William Greaves, director / 15 minutes (selections)
This program is a tribute to the first African-American television producer, who is a legendary
documentary filmmaker on issues of human rights.